What an incredibly pathetic way to keep a story going

OKAY, we get it. The Tories want us to believe that they think Damian Green is a victim of political persecution.

But this is truly pathetic. Andy Coulson’s idea, I assume?

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15 Comments

Filed under Conservative Party

15 responses to “What an incredibly pathetic way to keep a story going

  1. Andy

    Why? If you’d been the arrested one, you might have considered doing the same. I certainly would’t put it past the ripper home sec to have bugged him. See Tom, most of us don’t believe your gov ministers

  2. Bob Jones

    If the Police have nothing to hide then they have nothing to fear from is raided home being searched for bugs, do they?

  3. Nothing found? Quel surprise!

  4. richard

    They bugged Gerry Adams.

  5. Interesting comparison there, Richard.

  6. Donkey Kong

    Alistair, this isn’t funny anymore. Untie Tom at once!

  7. Johnny Norfolk

    Tom at last we have a Labour MP who is prepared to stand up for us all. I refere to Bob M Andrews, who has called on the speaker to stand down.
    The terrible thing about it is that he is the only one out of so many.
    The Speaker wont of course as he is so hard faced. To me he is the worst Speaker we have had.
    When I see him winking and smiling at only his own side you can see he is not impartial as he should be.
    He has no tact or humility and is completly unsuited to the post.
    We need a person who is fair minded and respected by the vast majority and Speaker Martin is not.
    However the longer he remains in post the more damage he inflicts on his party.

  8. ani

    Let them carry it on, and that’s their intention as Steve Richards disclosed today. But perhaps a warning from Sir Robin Butler this morning, in that he’d had reason to ask the police to investigate leaks in the past, which weren’t taken up as there was insufficient evidence. The fact that they have done this time?

    We’ll have to wait and see what develops, but I suspect that the loyal opposition isn’t on the front foot here, as the involvement of police and Tory MP’s? – there’s a history here they may hope won’t register in the public memory, but could well be regurgitated by the Government.

    And as things stand right now, perhaps the public are less focused on the dramas being enacted in the Commons, (and for the majority of the populace who have no interest in politics it could be perceived in simpler terms, that of an issue of right and wrong ie pinching and police, rather than constitutional) and be more concerned with what affects their real lives like families, jobs and mortgages. And Christmas.

  9. Rapunzel

    Have you ever found yourself questioning a young child who has done something wrong, but every time you ask them a question they:

    1. Plead innocence with wide eyes.
    2. Say they didn’t realise it WAS wrong.
    3. Tell you everyone does it
    4. Change the subject, hoping to distract you.
    5. Find someone else to blame.
    6. Tell you it’s all your fault.
    7. Jump up and down saying “It’s not fair!”

    Have you?

  10. Tacitus

    Whoops, missed this. New Labour’s response to the Green disaster

    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/bill-to-allow-commons-searches-with-no-warrant-1055697.html

    The vow by Commons Speaker Michael Martin to prevent “unauthorised” raids on MPs’ offices in the wake of the Damian Green affair was seriously undermined last night as it emerged that the Government is preparing new laws to allow investigators to mount parliamentary searches without a warrant.

    Words fail me. Tom – exactly who does Parliament represent? Us? Or you, the government, as it would now seem.

  11. Tacitus

    Tom,

    Why do so many government apparatchiks go on Common Purpose courses? Just who and what IS Common Purpose?

    Jackboot Jackie, I gather, has been sent on a leadership course. May I ask, how on earth someone without leadership skills rose to be Home Secretary? It wouldn’t be because she can be relied on to do what she is told to do, would it?

  12. Tacitus

    And finally, before a nice cup of coffee, a good graph showing democracy in action in the UK. It shows that Labour won the last election with just over 1 in 5 of the voters approval,

    Tom, we are still waiting on electoral reform, as promised … oh why do we even bother asking? New Labour don’t do promises, as Brown made quite clear over the Referendum.

    http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_ppUJUMk2JfI/STrz5Lg98aI/AAAAAAAAAys/-0HXzQ5d8_o/s1600-h/Labour20percent.jpg

  13. We’ve never promised to reform the electoral system. We did say, in 1997, that we’d hold a referendum on the issue, but fortunately that never happened. And if any proposal to reform the first-past-the-post system for the Commons comes forward, I will certainly vote against it, as will a majority of MPs.

  14. Tacitus

    Can’t remember whether I posted this on another of your articles, but Brown himself leaked info protected under the Official Secrets Act.

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/politics/lawandorder/3628293/Gordon-Brown-gave-me-leaked-Whitehall-secrets.html

    You will of course be seeking his prosecution, yes?

  15. “You will of course be seeking his prosecution, yes?”

    Why? I’m not aware of any other MP who’s being prosecuted or investigated simply for accepting a leak from a civil servant.

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