Pollwatch: Populus cuts Tory lead to four points

EVEN allowing for some pretty big variations in the polls recently, there does appear to be a general trend in Labour’s favour at the moment. It seems the pre-budget statement has gone down better with the public than with the media.

The latest Populus poll for The Times gives the Tories a four-point lead, down from six in November.

As I’ve said before, there is no justification in this for Labour to become complacent. But I would have thought that a government in its 12th year, about to lead the country through a difficult recession, would be much further behind any opposition – and any opposition leader – worth its salt.

Good to see we’ve managed to claw back a nine-point lead as the party most trusted to deal with the recession. The figures in full (with change since last month in brackets):

Conservative 39 (-2)
Labour 35 (0)
Liberal Democrats 17 (+1)

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15 Comments

Filed under Conservative Party, David Cameron, Economy, Labour, LibDems, Media, Polls

15 responses to “Pollwatch: Populus cuts Tory lead to four points

  1. Chris' Wills

    Time to call an election?

  2. “I would have thought that a government in its 12th year, about to lead the country through a difficult recession, would be much further behind any opposition – and any opposition leader – worth its salt.”

    Agreed. For THIS Government to be anywhere near having a chance in an election just goes to show how bad David Cameron’s Tories are.

  3. Chris

    As a loyal Labour member this is good news, but you are right Tom, no room for complacency – we are still behind after all. But the message is: all is not lost, it’s all to play for, let’s continue to rally round Gordon and the Government and get out and work our butts off between now and the election, whenever it is (and I’d still got for 2010).

    Keep up the good blogging!

  4. Red Eyes

    Bumbling Gordon Brown steered this country straight into the financial mess it is in and now proclaims himself as the only man who can steer us out of it. If he is such a great economist, how come he never saw this coming, whereas others like George Soros did. By the time the chickens come home to roost, I am sure he will be in the USA earning £1 million per month like Tony Bliar.

    It is a good thing that due to the dumbing down of education and thinking in this country and the fact that most of your core voters have been imported that you are riding high in the polls.

  5. Chris' Wills

    [Half the working population earns under £23,000. A couple need £11,000 to rise above the poverty threshold – and over a fifth of people fall below, with a third of children born poor.

    Only 10% get paid more than £40,000/year

    nicked from a grauniad article]

    The situation after NuLabors glorious decade and a bit; now with a recession looming it can only get worse.

    I’m stunned that so many get paid so little; 90% of the population get paid less than £40,000/year!!

    That’s before tax.

    Not good at all.

    We really do need to get shot of this incompetent mendacious set of troughers.

  6. I admit this may be a bit of a long shot, Chris, but you’re not a Labour voter, are you?

  7. labourboy

    And how exactly would a Conservative government increase the number of people being paid £40,000 so drastically?

    I can’t help but assume you’re being a bit london-centric there. Up north and beyond £40,000 is a very decent salary indeed.

    There’ll always be more assistants than managers.

    Ironically, that number would probably decrease once the Tories got in and got rid of all the quango’s wouldn’t it? 😉

  8. Chris' Wills

    @labourboy

    I’ll forgive you for thinking that I might be English or even worse a Londoner.

    Just a little geographical hint; Tom is my MP, unless they’ve moved the boundary since I last checked.

    If you looked at what I posted, I was suprised that 90% are paid less than £40,000/year and sad to see that 50% earn less £23,000 and that 20% earn below £11,000/year (the poverty level).

    I don’t consider £40,000/year before tax a bad wage, not great but not bad.

    But do you not think that, for all NuLabor’s rhetoric on the issue, it isn’t a inditment of their policies that the modal wage is so low.

    As for the quangos, as most of the people on those pick up over £40,000/year and aren’t a large percentage, even of the 10% who earn over £40,000, the removal of quangos wouldn’t have much effect on the modal wage (even if they were suddenly were paid zero). It would remove a lot of unaccountable officials spending public money and/or trying to manage our lives.

  9. Chris' Wills

    @Tom

    If I’m the Chris you’re addressing you could be correct.

    Will I vote for the party that robbed my pension, twice in my case?
    Will I vote for the party whose council ups my council tax at above inflation every year for no visible benefit?
    Will I vote for the party that made it harder and harder for me to work as a 1 man company?
    Will I vote for a party that claims to want to help the poor, but is introducing legislation to force single mothers to work and leave their young children in care?
    Will I vote for a party that can’t manage an IT contract?
    Will I vote for a party that is against individual freedom?
    etc etc

    Would you?

  10. Chris' Wills

    @Tom

    Hang on!
    You aren’t blogging on the way to the Palace are you?

  11. Chris' Wills

    @Tom

    If Oliver Postgate had stood I would have voted for him whichever party he represented (most likely Labour)

    A great man now sadly departed.

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/7770882.stm

  12. Chris – as a fan of his greatest work, “Noggin the Nog”, I’d probably agree with you on that one.

  13. Johnny Norfolk

    I hope all this good news for Labour will temp them to have an early election. He will not of course. He will stay on to the bitter end.

  14. Chris' Wills

    @ Tom

    I do remember looking forward to watching Noggin the Nog, totally enthralling.

    On the voting; Labour post WWII and upto the sixties did some great things for which I’ll always be grateful (NHS, University grants, social insurance amongst others); return to the ethos of helping people help themselves and abandon the desire to run everyones life and I may think about it.

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